Obama’s R-day visit: Lame game has no takers; visit will be strong and meaningful, experts say

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Alka Salpar 2025

It will take Indo US relations to a new high

 
Sid Harth

Alka Salpar MIT Pune Worked at Jabong Studied at MIT Pune Lives in Bangalore, India Pretty facebook page. Zero contributions, so far. How high is high enough for India-US relations to go up? How about mt Everest? maybe, Mount Abu/ oops, Mount Meru? Why not Mount Kailas? apart from working at ‘Jabong?’ what else did you do? Migrated to south? What? no job in Pune, the center of Maratha empire? Go slow, babe. This is man’s world. Confirm, if you are a man’s man, with a ‘six-pack’ to show off. I must admire your writing skills. ten words? Wow! I must nominate you for Smriti Irani’s ‘Girl-Child’ award for excellence in writing ten words, all at a time. Have a nice day in Bengaluru, the land of pagans like Muthalik-pink chaddiwala-Shiv Sena Hindutva-hoodlum. …and I am Sid Harth

Sid Harth

A Boehner spokesman said that the speaker does not have a dog …. …and I am Sid Harth

Sid Harth

“I cajoled and I called and I met. I told John Boehner, I’ll wash your car, I’ll walk your dog — whatever you need to do, just call the bill. That’s how democracy is supposed to work. And if the votes hadn’t been there, then we would have had to start over. But at least give it a shot — and he didn’t do it.”

Sid Harth

Obama essentially blamed Boehner for not allowing an immigration bill to come to the House floor.

Sid Harth

Flake said that there are limits to the idea of using appropriations legislation as a vehicle for GOP ultimatums or blocking the president’s federal nominees. “It’d be a political disaster to flirt with a government shutdown,” Flake said. “In the Senate, I don’t think we’ll go there, and I hope the House does not go there. There are always temptations, but I know the leadership doesn’t want that.” On blocking nominees, “That’s not the way to go, either. You play into the Democrats’ hands.” Limiting funding would require a 60-vote supermajority in the Senate, and it would almost certainly draw a veto from Obama, which, critics say, would lead to a possible shutdown of some federal agencies. Boehner declined to spell out exactly how Republicans would counter the immigration executive action, which extends protections to roughly 4 million undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents, as well as young immigrants brought here illegally when they were children. Later in the day, the House Homeland Security Committee announced plans to hold a hearing in response to Obama’s executive action. The panel said it will meet Dec. 3 to hear testimony from Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, who helped formulate Obama’s plans and deeply explored the legal justifications for the president’s actions. Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Tex.), who chairs the panel and has worked for several years on border-security matters, said he plans to use “every tool at my disposal to stop the president’s unconstitutional actions from being implemented, starting with this oversight hearing.”

Sid Harth

Speaking Friday at the Heritage Foundation, Sessions said such action was necessary because Obama “granted amnesty to 5 million people, and he did it by basically saying, ‘I’m not going to enforce the laws of the United States of America.’ “He ignored the interests of the American people, the American workers, recent immigrants who have been here and are looking for jobs in a time of unemployment. He undermined, in my view, the moral integrity of immigration law. And even the constitutional separation of powers. You have to have integrity and consistency in law enforcement if you want to be able to defend what you have done.” Sessions is leading the effort to keep government funding on a short leash in the new year, when Republicans take over the Senate and control both chambers of Congress, making it easier to get clear majorities for his preferred line of attack. Sessions dismissed the immigration reform bill the Senate passed last year, saying: “Politicians will pass anything that sounds good about immigration as long as it doesn’t change anything, as long as it won’t work.” But there are those in the GOP who worry that the anger may be playing into the president’s hands. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) said in an interview Friday that a growing group of Senate Republicans is coalescing around a more tempered rebuttal to the president: passing a series of standalone immigration bills in the coming months and demonstrating to voters that the party can govern. “Put legislation on the president’s desk,” Flake said. “We could do bills on border security, interior enforcement, mandatory E-Verify, and address high-tech workers and guest workers.”

Sid Harth

Pfeiffer said Obama would challenge critics of his executive action to pass legislation permanently reforming the immigration system, while at the same time making the moral case of deferring the deportations of millions of undocumented parents of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents. “There’s no reward for the meek here,” Pfeiffer said. The Republican response to Obama was anything but meek. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), a leading opponent of the president’s action and the likely incoming chairman of the budget committee, accused Obama of refusing to enforce the law and promised to use budgetary measures to prevent funding for the implementation of the new immigration rules.

Sid Harth

“The House has an obligation to stand up for the Constitution, and that is exactly why we are pursuing this course of action.” Obama launched his own persuasion campaign at a high school in Las Vegas where he had issued a call for immigration reform shortly after the start of his second term. “Nearly two years ago, I came here, Del Sol High School, right in this gymnasium . . . and I said that the time had come for Congress to fix our broken immigration system,” he said. Obama argued that lack of action by the GOP House is what forced his hand on taking unilateral action. “The fact that a year and a half has gone by means that time has been wasted,” Obama said. “And during that time, families have been separated. And during that time, businesses have been harmed. And we can’t afford it anymore.” Earlier on Friday, White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said that the president’s Las Vegas appearance should be read as the start of a “very aggressive sales job” on behalf of his policy changes. Speaker of the House John Boehner criticized the president’s plan for immigration reform the day after he announced it, saying that President Obama is making it “virtually impossible” to work in a bipartisan fashion. (AP) The president will also make his case on weekend television in an interview on ABC’S “This Week” and in a Chicago address on Tuesday. The White House’s sales job will include presidential speeches, interviews and appearances by Cabinet officials. Pfeiffer also said the White House’s efforts would be built around a heavy digital effort, previewed before Obama’s Thursday night speech in a video on Facebook, which drew more than 3.5 million views, according to Pfeiffer. “Our big focus [initially] was the digital audience,” he said. “We are going to use all the tools at our disposal.”

Sid Harth

Politics Republicans challenge Obama’s executive actions, file lawsuit over Obamacare Republicans are incensed by President Obama’s plan to defer deportations for four million undocumented immigrants. Here’s how Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.), Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) and Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) reacted after learning the details. (Jackie Kucinich/The Washington Post) By Katie Zezima and Robert Costa November 21 at 9:58 PM The political war over President Obama’s controversial policy changes on deportation escalated Friday as the White House pledged to forcefully sell the overhauls to the American people, while many Republicans vowed to derail his efforts. Obama went to Nevada on Friday to begin what the White House described as a “very aggressive” effort to promote the changes but also to chide his Republican critics for opposing immigration reform. “We’re not a nation that kicks out strivers and dreamers who want to earn their piece of the American dream,” Obama said. “We didn’t raise the Statue of Liberty with her back to the world. We did it with her light shining.” Back in Washington, Republicans were launching their own assaults, announcing that the House GOP had filed a lawsuit challenging the implementation of the 2010 health-care law and promising to turn back the immigration effort. “We’re working with our members and looking at the options available to us,” said House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio), “but I will say to you the House will, in fact, act.” President Obama announced new action to delay the deportation of about 4 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. Here are some numbers to know about immigration. (Julie Percha/The Washington Post) In what was clearly a coordinated campaign against what Republicans have labeled as Obama’s “imperial presidency,” Boehner announced the filing of the lawsuit minutes after he denounced Obama’s executive action on immigration. The suit, which was approved by House Republicans four months ago, was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. It will be led by Jonathan Turley, a law professor at the George Washington University Law School, who is the third legal adviser to handle the case. In recent weeks, some Republicans have pushed for including the immigration order in the lawsuit against the president. Instead, Boehner promised action in the House to counter Obama’s plans.

Sid Harth

The United States should be responsive to requests from small South China Sea littoral states that want assistance in improving their maritime policing and security capabilities. The United States needs to be completely committed to a very long-term, dedicated effort to improve the Armed Forces of the Philippine’s maritime capabilities. A mutually agreed upon AFP “minimum credible deterrent” plan deserves strong US support. Washington should not however, explicitly expand the scope of the Mutual Defense Treaty to cover the contested Philippine claims in the Spratlys. Washington should ensure that planned US military posture and capability improvements are portrayed as symbols of reassurance and stability-inducing presence and are not characterized as attempts to directly confront China. Emphasize that the objective of the military portion of the rebalance is to ensure that the US can fulfill its security responsibilities to its allies and is capable of assured access whenever required. US naval and air presence in the South China Sea should be a visible daily occurrence. The US Navy should increase the duration of its exercises with South China Sea littoral states, and expand participation in these exercises by inviting participation from other Asian maritime states, such as Japan, Australia, South Korea, and possibly India. RADM (ret) McDevitt, a long time commentator on US policy and security matters in East Asia, is a senior fellow at CNA Corporation, a not for profit research center in Arlington, Virginia. This article is drawn from his recent study, The South China Sea: Assessing US Policy and Options for the Future. PacNet commentaries and responses represent the views of the respective authors. Alternative viewpoints are always welcomed. Programs Pacific Forum CSIS, PacNet Newsletter Topics Defense and Security, International Security, Global Trends and Forecasting Regions Asia, China, Southeast Asia application/pdf icon Download PDF File of “PacNet #81 – Options for US policy toward the South China Sea” application/pdf icon Download PDF File of “PacNet #81 – Options for US policy toward the South China Sea” I shall be glad to debate with my good buddy, Chidanand Rajghattaa, Shri Modi or Sushma Swaraj. Moderated by Shri N Ram, no less. Jai Ho! …and I am Sid Harth

Sid Harth

The United States should reinforce its policy emphasis that international law is the basis for rules-based stability by issuing a comprehensive white paper, or a series of white papers, on the aspects of international law that pertain to the South China Sea. Because the focus on international law has been a centerpiece of US policy, these authoritative documents should be signed by the secretary of state and given appropriate publicity. The Department of State should consider issuing a statement in strong support of the arbitral tribunal ruling that it does have jurisdiction to review Manila’s request for a finding regarding China’s nine-dash line, among other things. This will permit the Philippines to have “its day in court” by agreeing that it does have jurisdiction. US policy-makers should explore with ASEAN and China the possibility of establishing a Joint Development Area (JDA) in the Spratlys aimed at exploitation of hydrocarbons. The goal would is to find a way to allow states to share these resources without prejudicing their position on final maritime boundaries. US policy makers should explore whether ASEAN would welcome US involvement aimed at moving the Code of Conduct process to conclusion.

Sid Harth

Overarching policy guidelines should include the following principles: The South China Sea is not the central strategic element in the overall US-China relationship. The South China Sea is an issue to be managed; a permanent solution is not likely in the near term. There is no one preferred format for negotiated outcomes. Bilateral negotiations should not be dismissed or portrayed as less desirable. The reality is that because of overlapping claims, solutions that are negotiated directly by the claimants are inevitable. Policy should not be overwhelmingly anti-Chinese. The US should criticize Chinese behavior along with the behavior of US friends and allies when warranted. China may have the best legal claim to all the land features, although that will never become a legal certainty unless Beijing agrees to arbitration. The US government should remain sensitive to the efforts of littoral states to involve the United States more deeply in supporting their claims to balance against China. In this regard, the State Department should conduct a legal analysis of the Philippine claims. If this analysis reaches the same conclusions as the analysis prepared for this project, Manila should be quietly informed of Washington’s opinion of its claims; particularly in the Spratlys. Washington should not announce policies that engage credibility in a way it is not prepared to back-up.

Sid Harth

So far, China’s actions in the South China Sea have not harmed its economy: its neighbors still line up seeking to improve relations. Beijing may not appreciate that its ASEAN neighbors simply want to retain their autonomy, but it does understand that its small neighbors do not want to be forced to choose between the United States and China. They all want the best possible relationship with both. Since these small countries will always be China’s neighbors and they will always need China more than it needs them, China can exercise great latitude in its approach to them. These factors are the reason that it is so difficult to get results from US policy. Finally, and most importantly, Beijing believes it has right and history on its side. It really does believe that all the land features and resources belong to China. That said, how should the US proceed?

Sid Harth

Its leaders can read a map. The realities of geography are that other claimants to South China Sea islands are always going to live in the shadow of China. China is already the largest trading partner with all of its Southeast Asian neighbors, and their economies are increasingly interlinked. An ASEAN consensus seems to be, “We are all afraid of China, but we are also afraid of what China might do to our economy if we cross them.” Finally, it is important to recognize the importance that China’s domestic issues have in President Xi Jinping’s approach to the South China Sea. In China, domestic politics always trumps foreign policy concerns. Being tough on sovereignty claims provides important political cover for Xi’s politically difficult attempts to reorient China’s economics, stamp out corruption in the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), and curb the power of provincial party secretaries who frequently act as regional despots. These factors, plus the fact that China has the largest and most powerful Asian military shape Beijing’s policy approach to the South China Sea. Its military modernization program, now past its 20th year, continues to be well planned and well executed. China’s conventional weapons capability is far superior to that of its neighbors, including India, and most certainly will remain so, at least for the foreseeable future.

Sid Harth

The administration’s public rhetoric has, over time, become far more specific and less “diplomatic.” It now specifically calls China’s actions destabilizing and bullying. Instead of giving vague exhortations, it also has become more specific in its commentary regarding the “rules.” It has been especially specific in addressing the most destabilizing aspect of the disputes in the South China Sea: the nine-dash line. Despite being judged sensible and proportionate, however, given the US interests involved, the Obama administration has been criticized from both the right and the left for not being “tough” enough with China. The simple reason for the criticism is that China has essentially ignored US exhortations to follow the rules, to stop pushing other claimants around, and to seek third-party arbitration to resolve claims. Beijing apparently believes that national interest trumps adherence to international law. China’s policies give the impression of not appreciating that being tough with its neighbors simply frightens them. This lack of self-awareness by Chinese interlocutors leaves some US officials wondering if China knows what is good for it. In their view, China is not acting in its own best interests. Arguably, China knows exactly what it is doing.

Sid Harth

PacNet #81 – Options for US policy toward the South China Sea By Michael McDevitt Nov 20, 2014 US policy toward the South China Sea is sensible, relatively comprehensive, and proportionate to the US interests involved. It is primarily diplomatic, but not entirely so. It focuses on creating stability by exhorting all the parties to follow the rules of international law. It explicitly defines how Washington would like conflicts to be solved. It includes hard-power initiatives aimed at redressing some of the power imbalance between the Philippines, Vietnam, and China. Finally, it incorporates an element of deterrence by not ignoring the US security alliance with the Philippines as well as providing access for US naval and air forces in Singapore and the Philippines.

Sid Harth

I dislike Modi but that is not a secret. My secrets, if there are any, are out in the open. How about Modi’s secrets, that our darling Doval-dough-boy is keeping in a deep underground fortified safe/ Just kidding. Modi deserves his dough-boy-devil. Just checking. Modi made nasty references to China. China that modi loves to do business in Vadgaum, Oops, Ahmedabad. The secret part of Modi-Xi Jinping is that Xi Jinping cares less what Modi says about China’s supremacy in their backwater-pond-aka-South China Seas. Getting back to Modi’s ‘chhupa rustam’ act. Without naming names-a typical RSS style, Modi accused China of messing in his, Modi’s backwater-pond, hold your breath, Pacific-Indian oceans-put together, that may include Arabian sea and Bengal sea. Wow! Modi must be thinking about his true ascendency to ‘jagatguru?’ More to follow…

balinder singh 1828

Modi went to America and spent his time in dancing in show. What is the outcome of his tour. Noe another such Tamasha is going to happen in Delhi. Both are just ?????

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Balkrishna Panday 9025

This MODBAMA brick work laid foundation of Indo-American structurals shall be weight-bearing and long lasting. The fortress shall have self-generating money
machines and weaponry to drive terror driven radicalism to wilderness. Allah, Allah, Khair – sallah.

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Sid Harth 11318

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IAF101 DMC • a month ago

Countries like India and China are distrustful of the claims about HFCs. Currently, non-HFC refrigerant production are technologies controlled by Japan, the USA and some countries in Europe. Further, the production of alternatives is FAR more costlier than the comparable costs for HFCs which millions of customers in the developing world use.

There is a suspicion among some circles that the motivating factor for Western nation’s push towards these new refrigerants is more due to commercial factors than anything environmental. Further, the costs of using alternatives today is so high that it puts refrigeration and cooling technologies out of the reach of millions who can now afford HFC refrigerant using appliances.

Without the West providing the technology or making available the IP on these alternative refrigerants in the public domain, there is very little incentive for nations like China or India to acquiesce to any “Protocols” about Global Warming – a theory that most in the West can’t even agree among themselves.

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Sid Harth 11318

DMC • a month ago

This is a brilliant article. Well said
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DMC • a month ago

The language on the venue for HFCs is pretty much identical to the G20 statement that Singh and Obama signed last fall, with both statements supporting use of “the institutions and expertise of the Montreal Protocol” to address HFCs while accounting for emissions in the UNFCCC. This article somehow calls this progress while even linking to a blog post noting that India’s agreement to this language last year meant nothing since India proceeded to oppose use of the MP for HFCs at the MP negotiations weeks later. So this language is more a sign of what hasn’t changed: U.S. getting strung along by ambiguity.

G20 from 2014: “We also support complementary initiatives, through multilateral approaches that include using the expertise and the institutions of the Montreal Protocol to phase down the production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), based on the examination of economically viable and technically feasible alternatives. We will continue to include HFCs within the scope of UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol for accounting and reporting of emissions.”

Obama/Modi statement: “The leaders recalled previous bilateral and multilateral statements on the phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). They recognized the need to use the institutions and expertise of the Montreal Protocol to reduce consumption and production of HFCs, while continuing to report and account for the quantities reduced under the UNFCCC.

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Sid Harth 11318

PlanetPolicy
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IAF101 • a month ago

This is an optimistic article. The reality is going to be far more realistic.

The USA has made grand statements and proclamations about Climate change and controlling emissions – yet comparatively even after 2 decades of the Kyoto Protocol, the USA remains the highest per capita emitter of carbon emissions.

Further, to add insult to injury the USA has not even pretended to live up to its commitments towards funding emission control initiatives, neither have the Europeans. Only the Japanese have been serious and dedicated in their commitments, thus far.

Considering the example of the last 20 odd years, the developing world will not do ANYTHING, until the nations responsible for the majority of global carbon emissions do FAR FAR MORE to prove their sincerity than what has been demonstrated thus far.

If Americans are unwilling to give up their hummers or the SUVs or even pay some of the way for developing countries in terms of making clean energy technologies more widely available – nations like India, China, etc are unlikely to sacrifice the upward mobility of millions of their citizens (which for quite a few would mean the difference between a life of poverty and hunger or a life of productivity, hope and health for themselves and their families) just to assuage the noble platitudes of the West.

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Sid Harth 11318

A second promising development was on nuclear cooperation. When done in a safe and secure manner, of course, nuclear power has one major positive benefit: it produces no greenhouse gas emissions. In that regard, the Obama-Modi meeting suggested promise on greater U.S.-India civilian nuclear cooperation. The U.S. and India had agreed nearly a decade ago to greater cooperation in an effort to bring more nuclear power to India. But those efforts have been stalled since the two sides differ on whether nuclear power-plant manufacturers or operators bear liability in the case of an accident or malfunction. The Obama-Modi summit was encouraging in that regard, as it called for the establishment of a nuclear energy contact group that will address implementation issues, including administrative issues, technical issues, licensing, and in particular, liability.

Beyond those concrete areas, both parties agreed to a “new and enhanced strategic partnership on energy security, clean energy, and climate change” that includes cooperation on developing “Energy Smart Cities” (with an emphasis on energy efficient infrastructure), cooperative efforts to scale-up renewable energy in India’s power grid, steps to promote investment in greater efficiency and innovation, and other clean power projects. They even signed a Memorandum of Understanding to make $1 billion available through the Export-Import bank for exporting US renewable technology to India.

Mr. Modi and President Obama have pledged to cooperate in a set of crucial areas– economic growth, energy and climate change, defense and security, high technology, and global and regional issues. In the area of climate change, bilateral cooperation has an opportunity to deliver.

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Sid Harth 11318

Tangible, Positive Steps Forward

Too often, international discussions about climate change only address the global climate talks. That is unfortunate, since the talks tend to be about long-term commitments and abstract legal frameworks, rather than concrete steps nations can take to cut greenhouse gases. Fortunately, the Obama-Modi meeting also paid attention to a few critical areas.

One specific area where both sides made progress is on beginning to reduce the impact of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). These are very potent man-made greenhouse gases found in household products such as air conditioners and refrigerators. HFCs trap far more heat than carbon dioxide does. They were created as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which had been depleting the ozone layer. When the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987, it greatly reduced CFC production, only to replace it with increased HFC production. While this switch helped to restore the ozone layer, the increased use of HFCs means that this potent greenhouse gas has been emitted in growing quantities. The joint statement from the Modi-Obama summit recognized the Montreal Protocol as the right forum for reducing HFCs, but with reporting and accounting under the UN body responsible for addressing climate change – the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Under the previous government, this had been a point of disagreement between the two sides since India opposed any action on HFCs under the Montreal Protocol. The Modi-Obama statement was an encouraging first step.

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Sid Harth 11318

That would still leave much more work for negotiators. In the Paris talks – as in all previous agreements – each nation will need to determine for itself what is an appropriate level of emissions cuts. They will then subject that level of ambition to international scrutiny.

Beyond that, countries will need to determine the legal nature of the agreement. Will it be “legally binding”, and administered by a central, UN organization? That was the design of the Kyoto Protocol – which was adopted by some nations, but ignored by others, like the United States. Or will it be a bottom-up, self-enforcing “agreement” like the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade? That agreement gained support in the United States, and became the basis for over fifty years of reductions in barriers to trade.

While Mr. Obama and Mr. Modi – or their teams – did not resolve any of those issues, it is certain that they are now aware that they will need to work closely together over the coming year to come up with a common framework for action. That is what the new U.S.-India Joint Working Group on Combating Climate Change will likely spend considerable time on.

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Sid Harth 11318

William J. Antholis | October 14, 2014 4:30pm
The Modi-Obama Summit: What This Means for Climate Change
U.S. President Barack Obama and India’s Prime Minister Narendra ModiAfter their summit at the end of September, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Barack Obama co-authored an op-ed in the Washington Post, and their two governments issued a robust “U.S.-India Joint Statement.” The statement was surprisingly ambitious about a broad, strategic and global partnership across a diverse range of issues — from trade, manufacturing, maritime security, e-governance, to even sanitation.Both leaders paid particular attention to energy and climate change. In fact, both sides seem to embrace their responsibilities for dealing with climate change, while acknowledging the different responsibilities that each country holds.From the perspective of those responsible for these issues in each country, there was some urgency to this meeting of the minds. There is just over a year to go before all nations come together in Paris for the next UN Climate Change Conference. Although China has surpassed both the United States and India combined in total emissions, the U.S. and India rank second and third in annual emissions. The world’s oldest and largest democracies will need to step forward and demonstrate leadership in Paris.The central question ahead, in the run-up to the Paris meeting, is how rich and poor nations will see their obligations. The most pressing version of this question is whether to revise the technical definition of “Common But Differentiated Responsibilities.” That term, coined in the early 1990s and enshrined in UN treaty language prior to the Kyoto Protocol, has become a major sticking point in the negotiations. Many in India stick to an old definition that means that developed countries are the only ones that have to take on obligations to limit emissions, where developing countries can still wait until they have become wealthier before accepting any constraints on their emissions growth. Developed countries – especially the United States – are pressing rapidly developing nations to take on a common framework for the obligations, even if the level of cuts are very different for rich and poor nations.

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Raj.s. Sequeira 52954

There is no pro India president in USA, they are all pro-USA presidents…..!!!

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Sid Harth 11318

Growing Awareness of Climate Change

Still, India increasingly sees the local impacts of climate change and growing coal use. The biggest climate impact has been on changing weather patterns in South Asia. Over the last 50 years, rising temperatures have led to a nearly 10 percent reduction in the duration and rainfall levels of the annual monsoons that are vital to nearly all Indian agriculture. Moreover, the melting of Himalayan glaciers threatens the country’s other vital water supply. In addition, rising sea levels have put hundreds of millions of Indians at risk in low-lying population centers in the Kolkata and Chennai metropolitan regions—a reality brought home during the devastating 2004 tsunami.

So Indians now take climate change more seriously. Dr. Rajendra Pachauri, head of the Energy and Resources Institute in New Delhi, has become a global spokesman for the cause. For a decade, he has headed the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change—the UN-backed research body that collects and reviews the scientific evidence that human activity has been the main contributor to climate change. And little by little, his fellow Indians have begun to take notice.

Perhaps most surprising to Pachauri was the phone call he received from Narendra Modi in 2009, then chief minister of Gujarat. Like many in New Delhi, Dr. Pachauri had only heard of Modi because of his role in the infamous Gujarat riots of 2002. Modi called to request a briefing on climate change. Pachauri was suspicious, but he agreed to host Modi and several top advisors for a two-day seminar.

Modi returned home to Gujarat with the zeal of a convert. He launched the first state-level ministry to address the issue and promoted the use of renewables, especially solar. As he told me, “For me, this is a moral issue. You don’t have a right to exploit what belongs to future generations. We are only allowed to milk the earth, not to kill it.”

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Sid Harth 11318

India, Coal, and Greenhouse Gases

In my previous post, I described India’s challenges in taking advantage of its wealth of energy resources. That has been particularly true of efforts to access and use coal.

But in fact, not exploiting fossil fuels has had one positive benefit: it has been good for the global climate. India already is a greenhouse gas giant: it is the world’s third-largest national emitter. But if it had fully exploited its coal and gas resources, its emissions would be much greater. At 2 gigatons in 2012, its carbon emissions ranked far behind those of the United States (5.2 gigatons) and China (9.9 gigatons). When adjusted for population, the average Indian emits four times less than the average Chinese and ten times less than the average American. Of course, one of the reasons that the average Indian emits so few greenhouse gases is because hundreds of millions of Indians are still not connected to the grid.

That disparity in average emissions per person has dominated India’s position on global climate talks for two decades. Since the 1992 Rio Earth Summit, India has been the strongest voice for “common but differentiated” responsibilities. Those were enshrined in the famous 1997 Kyoto Protocol where developing countries avoided binding agreements to reduce their emissions until developed economies first dramatically slashed their own.

For over a decade after Kyoto, India refused to discuss any binding limits. Indians would only discuss binding targets when other countries had reduced their own emissions to the per-person level of the average Indian – which at current rates would not happen until sometime in the 2030-2040 range.

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Sid Harth 11318

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sidileakdotcomma/?p=3542Sep 1, 2014 – That does not however stop Modi implementing policies that the last … and bring back foreign investors who, though they are piling record …
भगोडा घोडा: नमो का मनो परिवर्तन? | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3422Aug 29, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3422 … Modi Government To Shop For Choppers in India. … 5 hours ago – Opinion | August 29, 2014 Indian Prime Minister Modi’s Foreign Policy: The First 100 Days By: Tanvi Madan Selectively …

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Sid Harth 11318

Modi: A Hindutva Shogun | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3506Aug 31, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3506. 6 hours ago – Why is Japan wooing Narendra Modi? …. neighbourhood as Prime Minister, he said it underlines “the high priority” that Japan receives in India’s foreign and economic policies.
WTO: Modi’s Kodak Moment | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1512WTO: Modi’s Kodak Moment. July 21, 2014 elcidharth …sidileakdotcomma/?p=1512. 4 hours ago – All 160 WTO … Modi Sarkar’s Missing Foreign Policy | So Sue me … Brics and later: PM Modi’s foreign policy must reflect … Brazil from …
Modi, a hot air balloon, Oops, Buffoon | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=2658Aug 12, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=2658. Modi … Narendra Modi, the leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party, has spent this campaign season ….. Although Modi has not made a dramatic foreign policy speech since taking office, his choices …
Modi’s BRICS Summit Propaganda | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=733Jul 12, 2014 – Modi’s Propaganda on BRICS Summit | So Sue me.sidileakdotcomma/?p=731. 5 hours ago – googledotcomma/#q=sidi…. …. summit and examining its implications for U.S. foreign policy and the broader international …
मोदी सरकार चा सन्नाट-भन्नाट कारभार | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=2792Aug 17, 2014 – Will Prime Minister Narendra Modi abolish Planning Commission? …. when Modi had hit the ground running on foreign policy issues with his …
Modi Hit With a Ton of BRICS | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1016Jul 15, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=1016 … IMF is the lender of last resort to countries that don’t have the dollars to pay their foreign debt. … 20 hours ago – Modi Messing With Monetary Policy · July 15, 2014 elcidharth Leave a comment.

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Sid Harth 11318

अबेचट मंगनी लेकिन NO ब्याह, उफ़्फ़ …
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3550Sep 1, 2014

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Sid Harth 11318

Modi’s Info-Blackout | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3323Aug 27, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3323 … Modi’s
media plan under spotlight after Rajnath episode. …. This time they
may be more free to push forth the policies ….. His most confident
steps have come in the realm of foreign policy, where …
Protects Criminals | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3449Aug 30, 2014 – 100 days: ‘Policies’ the Modi govt and BJP won’t talk about. by … There is a look-East policy on foreign affairs, a look North-East policy …

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Sid Harth 11318

So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=36586 days ago – In the Brookings Foreign Policy Brief, “Keeping the South China Sea in Perspective,” ….sidileakdotcomma/?paged=696.

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Jatin Jindal 6085

According to the author, R-Day parade is just a showcase of India’s military heft.. Why the author was silent from past 67 parades..

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Bharat Sharma 1254

When Obama called him man of action India lost at WTO… when he comes to Delhi what more will India loose… ? Modi can sell off anything for personal appreciation…

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Indian forever

another looser in India. A paki or paki booster congress

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Squarepeg 7445

Better to wait and watch and hope something great comes out of this. Why be prejudiced this way or that.

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SCL P 33874

This visit by Obama shall not be an ordinary customary guest for ceremonial reasons. It will on the other hand lift the bilateral relationship between the two nations to a higher plane in the minds of the leaders, officials and the public alike.

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Sid Harth 11318

Minister Narendra Modi while expressing … “On September 6, a …. analyzes India’s humanitarian aid as part of its foreign policy, asking why India gives humanitarian …
Obama-Modi Duet | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=2944Aug 20, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=2944 …. Argument The U.S. Needs to Modi-fy its India Policy How Washington should … BY Alyssa Ayres MAY 20, 2014 Share 427 Shares U.S. Foreign Policy India South Asia India has just voted the …
Modi’s India, Oops, Australia First | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1858Jul 28, 2014 – Modi Sarkar’s Missing Foreign Policy | So Sue me – Sid Harth.sidileakdotcomma/?p=992. Jul 15, 2014 – July 15, 2014 elcidharth …
Mr Modi, Wake up, Please III | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1787Jul 26, 2014 – The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit: A Focus on Foreign Direct Investment …. The EU has a similar set of policies manifested in its Accounting and …
Modi Hates Muslims, Loves jews | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1246Jul 18, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=1246 … Sep 1, 2012 – Muslims, but haven’t yet heard Modi even remotely regret the killings of 2002. … civil connections with Israel — India’s avowed policy in the Southern Levant has

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Sid Harth 11318

US-India meet: Can Obama look into Modi’s eyes and see his soul?

Mitt Movie – My Sister Marilyn Monroe
mysistermarilynmonroedotcomma/… 18, 2014 – Aug 29, 2012 – Aug 21, 2012 – It’s Mitt Romney’s Foreign Policy, Stupid … … Modi, a Dead man Walking | My Sister Marilyn Monroe …. That means that links from sidileakdotcomma have a small influence on the search engine …
Ukraine Crisis – वसुधैव कुटुंबकम
?p=… 25, 2014 – “Suffice to say we’ve looked at our policy options,” she said. “We know … Narendra Modimania: Sid Harth | News, Views and Reviews: Sid Harth … US (Fucked-up) Foreign Policy and I – cogito ergo sum sidileakdotus 1 …
Hang Narendra Modi – My Sister Eileen
mysistereileendotorg/?p=699India… Narendra Modi wins 3rd term as state leader, setting stage for prime ministerial bid …… Policy Director, Just Foreign Policy ….. Jun 30, 2011 – More ….sidileakdotus/2012/01/arrest…. Jan 27, 2012 …
Uncategorized – My Sister Eileen – Page 209
mysistereileendotnet/?cat=1&… 18, 2013 – Government shutdown · Hang Narendra ‘maut ka saudagar’ Modi · Goodbye Food Stamps, Hello Food Fights! … Blower, Julian Assange and I · Mitt Romney’s Family, Oops, Foreign Policy Secrets and I … sidileakdotcomma/…

Modi’s BRICS Encounter of the Third Kind | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=752Jul 13, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=752. 5 hours ago – Modi’s BRICS Encounter of the Third Kind … 6th BRICS summit in Brazil: Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s statement. TNN | Jul 13 …. Modi has a zero (0) background in foreign policy.
Uncategorized | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?cat=1.sid…. 5 hours ago – Modi: … He said that Prime

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raman.raman3 Raman 40478

Good beginning to strengthen the ties between the two countries and great gesture by Prez Obama as he knows PM Modi is a man of action and can get things done fast .In the present scenerio the India-US ties is very important and this will dilute the influence of Pakistan to a great extent.

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shruti

What so great. He is the least popular president of
USA

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reader x 13998

really.

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Sid Harth 11360

DMC • a month ago

This is a brilliant article. Well said
Avatar
DMC • a month ago

The language on the venue for HFCs is pretty much identical to the G20 statement that Singh and Obama signed last fall, with both statements supporting use of “the institutions and expertise of the Montreal Protocol” to address HFCs while accounting for emissions in the UNFCCC. This article somehow calls this progress while even linking to a blog post noting that India’s agreement to this language last year meant nothing since India proceeded to oppose use of the MP for HFCs at the MP negotiations weeks later. So this language is more a sign of what hasn’t changed: U.S. getting strung along by ambiguity.

G20 from 2014: “We also support complementary initiatives, through multilateral approaches that include using the expertise and the institutions of the Montreal Protocol to phase down the production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), based on the examination of economically viable and technically feasible alternatives. We will continue to include HFCs within the scope of UNFCCC and its Kyoto Protocol for accounting and reporting of emissions.”

Obama/Modi statement: “The leaders recalled previous bilateral and multilateral statements on the phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). They recognized the need to use the institutions and expertise of the Montreal Protocol to reduce consumption and production of HFCs, while continuing to report and account for the quantities reduced under the UNFCCC.

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Sid Harth 11360

PlanetPolicy
SiDevilIam

Avatar
IAF101 • a month ago

This is an optimistic article. The reality is going to be far more realistic.

The USA has made grand statements and proclamations about Climate change and controlling emissions – yet comparatively even after 2 decades of the Kyoto Protocol, the USA remains the highest per capita emitter of carbon emissions.

Further, to add insult to injury the USA has not even pretended to live up to its commitments towards funding emission control initiatives, neither have the Europeans. Only the Japanese have been serious and dedicated in their commitments, thus far.

Considering the example of the last 20 odd years, the developing world will not do ANYTHING, until the nations responsible for the majority of global carbon emissions do FAR FAR MORE to prove their sincerity than what has been demonstrated thus far.

If Americans are unwilling to give up their hummers or the SUVs or even pay some of the way for developing countries in terms of making clean energy technologies more widely available – nations like India, China, etc are unlikely to sacrifice the upward mobility of millions of their citizens (which for quite a few would mean the difference between a life of poverty and hunger or a life of productivity, hope and health for themselves and their families) just to assuage the noble platitudes of the West.

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Sid Harth 11360

A second promising development was on nuclear cooperation. When done in a safe and secure manner, of course, nuclear power has one major positive benefit: it produces no greenhouse gas emissions. In that regard, the Obama-Modi meeting suggested promise on greater U.S.-India civilian nuclear cooperation. The U.S. and India had agreed nearly a decade ago to greater cooperation in an effort to bring more nuclear power to India. But those efforts have been stalled since the two sides differ on whether nuclear power-plant manufacturers or operators bear liability in the case of an accident or malfunction. The Obama-Modi summit was encouraging in that regard, as it called for the establishment of a nuclear energy contact group that will address implementation issues, including administrative issues, technical issues, licensing, and in particular, liability.

Beyond those concrete areas, both parties agreed to a “new and enhanced strategic partnership on energy security, clean energy, and climate change” that includes cooperation on developing “Energy Smart Cities” (with an emphasis on energy efficient infrastructure), cooperative efforts to scale-up renewable energy in India’s power grid, steps to promote investment in greater efficiency and innovation, and other clean power projects. They even signed a Memorandum of Understanding to make $1 billion available through the Export-Import bank for exporting US renewable technology to India.

Mr. Modi and President Obama have pledged to cooperate in a set of crucial areas– economic growth, energy and climate change, defense and security, high technology, and global and regional issues. In the area of climate change, bilateral cooperation has an opportunity to deliver.

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Sid Harth 11360

Tangible, Positive Steps Forward

Too often, international discussions about climate change only address the global climate talks. That is unfortunate, since the talks tend to be about long-term commitments and abstract legal frameworks, rather than concrete steps nations can take to cut greenhouse gases. Fortunately, the Obama-Modi meeting also paid attention to a few critical areas.

One specific area where both sides made progress is on beginning to reduce the impact of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). These are very potent man-made greenhouse gases found in household products such as air conditioners and refrigerators. HFCs trap far more heat than carbon dioxide does. They were created as a replacement for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which had been depleting the ozone layer. When the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987, it greatly reduced CFC production, only to replace it with increased HFC production. While this switch helped to restore the ozone layer, the increased use of HFCs means that this potent greenhouse gas has been emitted in growing quantities. The joint statement from the Modi-Obama summit recognized the Montreal Protocol as the right forum for reducing HFCs, but with reporting and accounting under the UN body responsible for addressing climate change – the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Under the previous government, this had been a point of disagreement between the two sides since India opposed any action on HFCs under the Montreal Protocol. The Modi-Obama statement was an encouraging first step.

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Sid Harth 11360

That would still leave much more work for negotiators. In the Paris talks – as in all previous agreements – each nation will need to determine for itself what is an appropriate level of emissions cuts. They will then subject that level of ambition to international scrutiny.

Beyond that, countries will need to determine the legal nature of the agreement. Will it be “legally binding”, and administered by a central, UN organization? That was the design of the Kyoto Protocol – which was adopted by some nations, but ignored by others, like the United States. Or will it be a bottom-up, self-enforcing “agreement” like the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade? That agreement gained support in the United States, and became the basis for over fifty years of reductions in barriers to trade.

While Mr. Obama and Mr. Modi – or their teams – did not resolve any of those issues, it is certain that they are now aware that they will need to work closely together over the coming year to come up with a common framework for action. That is what the new U.S.-India Joint Working Group on Combating Climate Change will likely spend considerable time on.

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Sid Harth 11360

William J. Antholis | October 14, 2014 4:30pm
The Modi-Obama Summit: What This Means for Climate Change
U.S. President Barack Obama and India’s Prime Minister Narendra ModiAfter their summit at the end of September, Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Barack Obama co-authored an op-ed in the Washington Post, and their two governments issued a robust “U.S.-India Joint Statement.” The statement was surprisingly ambitious about a broad, strategic and global partnership across a diverse range of issues — from trade, manufacturing, maritime security, e-governance, to even sanitation.Both leaders paid particular attention to energy and climate change. In fact, both sides seem to embrace their responsibilities for dealing with climate change, while acknowledging the different responsibilities that each country holds.From the perspective of those responsible for these issues in each country, there was some urgency to this meeting of the minds. There is just over a year to go before all nations come together in Paris for the next UN Climate Change Conference. Although China has surpassed both the United States and India combined in total emissions, the U.S. and India rank second and third in annual emissions. The world’s oldest and largest democracies will need to step forward and demonstrate leadership in Paris.The central question ahead, in the run-up to the Paris meeting, is how rich and poor nations will see their obligations. The most pressing version of this question is whether to revise the technical definition of “Common But Differentiated Responsibilities.” That term, coined in the early 1990s and enshrined in UN treaty language prior to the Kyoto Protocol, has become a major sticking point in the negotiations. Many in India stick to an old definition that means that developed countries are the only ones that have to take on obligations to limit emissions, where developing countries can still wait until they have become wealthier before accepting any constraints on their emissions growth. Developed countries – especially the United States – are pressing rapidly developing nations to take on a common framework for the obligations, even if the level of cuts are very different for rich and poor nations.

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Raj.s. Sequeira 52954

There is no pro India president in USA, they are all pro-USA presidents…..!!!

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Sid Harth 11360

Growing Awareness of Climate Change

Still, India increasingly sees the local impacts of climate change and growing coal use. The biggest climate impact has been on changing weather patterns in South Asia. Over the last 50 years, rising temperatures have led to a nearly 10 percent reduction in the duration and rainfall levels of the annual monsoons that are vital to nearly all Indian agriculture. Moreover, the melting of Himalayan glaciers threatens the country’s other vital water supply. In addition, rising sea levels have put hundreds of millions of Indians at risk in low-lying population centers in the Kolkata and Chennai metropolitan regions—a reality brought home during the devastating 2004 tsunami.

So Indians now take climate change more seriously. Dr. Rajendra Pachauri, head of the Energy and Resources Institute in New Delhi, has become a global spokesman for the cause. For a decade, he has headed the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change—the UN-backed research body that collects and reviews the scientific evidence that human activity has been the main contributor to climate change. And little by little, his fellow Indians have begun to take notice.

Perhaps most surprising to Pachauri was the phone call he received from Narendra Modi in 2009, then chief minister of Gujarat. Like many in New Delhi, Dr. Pachauri had only heard of Modi because of his role in the infamous Gujarat riots of 2002. Modi called to request a briefing on climate change. Pachauri was suspicious, but he agreed to host Modi and several top advisors for a two-day seminar.

Modi returned home to Gujarat with the zeal of a convert. He launched the first state-level ministry to address the issue and promoted the use of renewables, especially solar. As he told me, “For me, this is a moral issue. You don’t have a right to exploit what belongs to future generations. We are only allowed to milk the earth, not to kill it.”

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Sid Harth 11360

India, Coal, and Greenhouse Gases

In my previous post, I described India’s challenges in taking advantage of its wealth of energy resources. That has been particularly true of efforts to access and use coal.

But in fact, not exploiting fossil fuels has had one positive benefit: it has been good for the global climate. India already is a greenhouse gas giant: it is the world’s third-largest national emitter. But if it had fully exploited its coal and gas resources, its emissions would be much greater. At 2 gigatons in 2012, its carbon emissions ranked far behind those of the United States (5.2 gigatons) and China (9.9 gigatons). When adjusted for population, the average Indian emits four times less than the average Chinese and ten times less than the average American. Of course, one of the reasons that the average Indian emits so few greenhouse gases is because hundreds of millions of Indians are still not connected to the grid.

That disparity in average emissions per person has dominated India’s position on global climate talks for two decades. Since the 1992 Rio Earth Summit, India has been the strongest voice for “common but differentiated” responsibilities. Those were enshrined in the famous 1997 Kyoto Protocol where developing countries avoided binding agreements to reduce their emissions until developed economies first dramatically slashed their own.

For over a decade after Kyoto, India refused to discuss any binding limits. Indians would only discuss binding targets when other countries had reduced their own emissions to the per-person level of the average Indian – which at current rates would not happen until sometime in the 2030-2040 range.

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Paadi Pantalu 9122

SIdharth, You are a spammer. India has lowest per capita green house gas emitter in the world while US and Japan are at tis worst followed by Europe and then China. This will change with the increased middle class but you are wrong on several counts. India shall consume all its coal before going nuclear. It has to minimize CO emissions but CO2 emission combined with massive forestation will not damage mother earth. Stop spreading western lies.

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Sid Harth 11360

Modi Misbehaves in Japan | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3580Sep 2, 2014 – It also gives a good peek into what Modi’s foreign policy is really like.Since the moment Narendra Modi invited the Saarc heads of state to …
कृण्वन्तुविश्वमार्यम् | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3513Aug 31, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3513 ….. Modi is likely to double down on the theme of foreign policy as foreign economic policy, with India’s …
Modi’s Foreign Policy: MoFoPo | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1002Jul 15, 2014 – This attempt is also leading to a focus on South Asia as a central strand in Modi’s emerging foreign policy priorities. Inviting all country leaders …
BJP Exposed | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=38391 day ago – The BJP will also have to use the Modi factor, though the latter may not … the Congress and the BJP agreed over foreign policies that brought …
Modi: Make a Mountain out of a Molehill | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3428Aug 29, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3428. Modi: … World is watching every move PM Modi makes. From his …. So, when it comes to Modi’s foreign policy, what have we seen and not seen, what do we now know and still not know?
Modi Lies in Japan | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3583Sep 2, 2014 – Japan has played important role in India’s development: Modi · Live … READ ALSO: With bricks and mortar, Modi puts a foreign policy in place
Modi Sarkar’s Missing Foreign Policy | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=992Jul 15, 2014 – Beginning this week with the Brics summit at Fortaleza and Brasilia in Brazil, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has a packed foreign policy …
Narendra Modi’s Japan Visit | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3278Aug 26, 2014 – Modi hails India-Japan ties, says looking forward to visit … ministerial summits every year–a rare feature in the foreign policy of each country.
Modi: Stuck in the mud 100 days | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3542Sep 1, 2014 – That does not however stop Modi implementing policies that the last … and bring back foreign investors who, though they are piling record …
भगोडा घोडा: नमो का मनो परिवर्तन? | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3422Aug 29, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3422 … Modi Government To Shop For Choppers in India. … 5 hours ago – Opinion | August 29, 2014 Indian Prime Minister Modi’s Foreign Policy: The First 100 Days By: Tanvi Madan Selectively …

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Sid Harth 11360

Modi: A Hindutva Shogun | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3506Aug 31, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3506. 6 hours ago – Why is Japan wooing Narendra Modi? …. neighbourhood as Prime Minister, he said it underlines “the high priority” that Japan receives in India’s foreign and economic policies.
WTO: Modi’s Kodak Moment | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1512WTO: Modi’s Kodak Moment. July 21, 2014 elcidharth …sidileakdotcomma/?p=1512. 4 hours ago – All 160 WTO … Modi Sarkar’s Missing Foreign Policy | So Sue me … Brics and later: PM Modi’s foreign policy must reflect … Brazil from …
Modi, a hot air balloon, Oops, Buffoon | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=2658Aug 12, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=2658. Modi … Narendra Modi, the leader of the Bharatiya Janata Party, has spent this campaign season ….. Although Modi has not made a dramatic foreign policy speech since taking office, his choices …
Modi’s BRICS Summit Propaganda | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=733Jul 12, 2014 – Modi’s Propaganda on BRICS Summit | So Sue me.sidileakdotcomma/?p=731. 5 hours ago – googledotcomma/#q=sidi…. …. summit and examining its implications for U.S. foreign policy and the broader international …
मोदी सरकार चा सन्नाट-भन्नाट कारभार | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=2792Aug 17, 2014 – Will Prime Minister Narendra Modi abolish Planning Commission? …. when Modi had hit the ground running on foreign policy issues with his …
Modi Hit With a Ton of BRICS | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1016Jul 15, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=1016 … IMF is the lender of last resort to countries that don’t have the dollars to pay their foreign debt. … 20 hours ago – Modi Messing With Monetary Policy · July 15, 2014 elcidharth Leave a comment.

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Sid Harth 11360

अबेचट मंगनी लेकिन NO ब्याह, उफ़्फ़ …
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3550Sep 1, 2014

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Sid Harth 11360

Modi’s Info-Blackout | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3323Aug 27, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=3323 … Modi’s
media plan under spotlight after Rajnath episode. …. This time they
may be more free to push forth the policies ….. His most confident
steps have come in the realm of foreign policy, where …
Protects Criminals | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=3449Aug 30, 2014 – 100 days: ‘Policies’ the Modi govt and BJP won’t talk about. by … There is a look-East policy on foreign affairs, a look North-East policy …

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Sid Harth 11360

So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=36586 days ago – In the Brookings Foreign Policy Brief, “Keeping the South China Sea in Perspective,” ….sidileakdotcomma/?paged=696.

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Jatin Jindal 6088

According to the author, R-Day parade is just a showcase of India’s military heft.. Why the author was silent from past 67 parades..

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Bharat Sharma 1255

When Obama called him man of action India lost at WTO… when he comes to Delhi what more will India loose… ? Modi can sell off anything for personal appreciation…

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Indian forever

another looser in India. A paki or paki booster congress

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Squarepeg 7458

Better to wait and watch and hope something great comes out of this. Why be prejudiced this way or that.

0 0 Reply Flag
SCL P 33877

This visit by Obama shall not be an ordinary customary guest for ceremonial reasons. It will on the other hand lift the bilateral relationship between the two nations to a higher plane in the minds of the leaders, officials and the public alike.

1 0 Reply Flag
Sid Harth 11360

Minister Narendra Modi while expressing … “On September 6, a …. analyzes India’s humanitarian aid as part of its foreign policy, asking why India gives humanitarian …
Obama-Modi Duet | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=2944Aug 20, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=2944 …. Argument The U.S. Needs to Modi-fy its India Policy How Washington should … BY Alyssa Ayres MAY 20, 2014 Share 427 Shares U.S. Foreign Policy India South Asia India has just voted the …
Modi’s India, Oops, Australia First | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1858Jul 28, 2014 – Modi Sarkar’s Missing Foreign Policy | So Sue me – Sid Harth.sidileakdotcomma/?p=992. Jul 15, 2014 – July 15, 2014 elcidharth …
Mr Modi, Wake up, Please III | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1787Jul 26, 2014 – The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit: A Focus on Foreign Direct Investment …. The EU has a similar set of policies manifested in its Accounting and …
Modi Hates Muslims, Loves jews | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?p=1246Jul 18, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=1246 … Sep 1, 2012 – Muslims, but haven’t yet heard Modi even remotely regret the killings of 2002. … civil connections with Israel — India’s avowed policy in the Southern Levant has

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Sid Harth 11360

US-India meet: Can Obama look into Modi’s eyes and see his soul?

Mitt Movie – My Sister Marilyn Monroe
mysistermarilynmonroedotcomma/… 18, 2014 – Aug 29, 2012 – Aug 21, 2012 – It’s Mitt Romney’s Foreign Policy, Stupid … … Modi, a Dead man Walking | My Sister Marilyn Monroe …. That means that links from sidileakdotcomma have a small influence on the search engine …
Ukraine Crisis – वसुधैव कुटुंबकम
?p=… 25, 2014 – “Suffice to say we’ve looked at our policy options,” she said. “We know … Narendra Modimania: Sid Harth | News, Views and Reviews: Sid Harth … US (Fucked-up) Foreign Policy and I – cogito ergo sum sidileakdotus 1 …
Hang Narendra Modi – My Sister Eileen
mysistereileendotorg/?p=699India… Narendra Modi wins 3rd term as state leader, setting stage for prime ministerial bid …… Policy Director, Just Foreign Policy ….. Jun 30, 2011 – More ….sidileakdotus/2012/01/arrest…. Jan 27, 2012 …
Uncategorized – My Sister Eileen – Page 209
mysistereileendotnet/?cat=1&… 18, 2013 – Government shutdown · Hang Narendra ‘maut ka saudagar’ Modi · Goodbye Food Stamps, Hello Food Fights! … Blower, Julian Assange and I · Mitt Romney’s Family, Oops, Foreign Policy Secrets and I … sidileakdotcomma/…

Modi’s BRICS Encounter of the Third Kind | So Sue me
sidileakdotcomma/?p=752Jul 13, 2014 –sidileakdotcomma/?p=752. 5 hours ago – Modi’s BRICS Encounter of the Third Kind … 6th BRICS summit in Brazil: Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s statement. TNN | Jul 13 …. Modi has a zero (0) background in foreign policy.
Uncategorized | So Sue me – Sid Harth
sidileakdotcomma/?cat=1.sid…. 5 hours ago – Modi: … He said that Prime